The 5 Questions Brides Wish They Had Asked their Wedding Videographer

By on 4:43 PM

There’s nothing like hindsight to give some clarity as to the questions you would have asked, had you known what would go wrong that is. Luckily for brides today there is the internet; this invaluable tool helps brides to learn from the misfortunes and misgivings of couples far and wide when it comes to making bad decisions about the big day. While it might seem that with today’s technology any old point-and-shoot camera should do the trick when it comes to a wedding videographer, just ask a couple who has a grainy five minute VHS with Michael Bolton playing over all the sound bytes if there’s any difference. That being said, here are the top 5 questions brides wish they had asked their wedding videographers… before putting down the deposit.

5. What will be the picture quality of the final product?
Many videographers throw out terms like “HD” and impress unwitting couples into choosing their “state of the art” video service, but don’t be impressed until you’ve seen a sample. Not every amateur or freelance videographer has the right technology not only to shoot a good video at such high resolution, nor the equipment to edit it properly. See some samples and decide what looks best to you. Also keep in mind that not every shot is flattering in high definition, and take some test shots before the big day.

4. Will you be using microphones?
Almost nobody thinks to ask this question, but almost everyone has to crank up the volume when it comes to any part of the wedding video with speeches, toasts, or vows. Instead of leaving it to chance find out if the videographer plans to bug the altar, use wireless mics on participants, or make friends with the sound guy at the reception to get a direct feed into the audio. If the videographer is simply filming these speeches from afar, it’s not very likely you’ll hear a word that’s said.

3. How many cameras and camera operators will you be using?
This one is important especially if you have a large wedding, a large wedding party or a large wedding venue. One camera operator can only be one place at once. Some set up stationary cameras to supplement their footage, but these are only really useful for far-off shots, the ceremony or speeches. You’ll find you get the best results if there are at least two camera operators who are twice as likely to be in the right place at the right time to catch the very most special of moments.

2. Have you done this before?
Shockingly enough, many people fail to ask this question. This question does not refer to student films, friend’s weddings with home equipment or bar mitzvahs. This question refers specifically and exclusively to hiring a client, filming a wedding, producing an end product that the couple loves, and correctly billing the couple for it. As mentioned before, ask for samples.

1. Are there choices on music and style?
Even the best videographer with the best shots can still product a cringe-worthy end product with sappy love songs, fading transitions and love heart frame effects if not properly guided during the post-production phase of the program. Ask before if there are choices and provide some very specific suggestions if you want an end-product you can actually stand to watch!

Author Bio:
Jessica Josh is a freelancer who makes her living by writing and blogging online. She has worked with a number of different businesses in the wedding bands and wedding videography niche such as http://weddingbandsmelbourne88.com.au/.

About Olga Pomeransky

Olga is manager at Best for Bride since 2005. Currently Best for Bride operates 4 bridal stores in Canada (Toronto, Etobicoke, Hamilton and Barrie). Best for Bride sells wedding, bridemaids, mob dresses and more. http://www.BestForBride.com

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