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What you should do before you meet your wedding cake designer

If you are a bride whose dream wedding vision includes a towering, magnificent and spellbinding masterpiece cake, detailed wedding cake plans are on your list of must-do’s!

Your cake designer is a single person who can bring your perfect wedding cake to life. However, she needs your ideas and inputs to execute the plan to perfection. Although she may have her own suggestions and ideas, it may not meet your expectations unless you provide her the blueprint to plan her cake around. This simply means that you cannot start with a blank slate. You need to first do a list of things before you meet with your cake designer and discuss the cake design. Let us take a look at this list now.

Get inspired

Just like with wedding dresses, there is a whole world of fabulous wedding cakes waiting to be discovered. You will find drool-worthy pages and pages on Pinterest, in bridal magazines, on cake websites as well as on our own wedding cake gallery. Your first step to planning your wedding cake is identifying what you want. Begin by setting up a wedding inspiration board (read all about it on our previous post here), and adding pictures to it. If you find interesting pictures in magazines, collect them too. Begin at random, by just dragging any picture that appeals to you onto your inspiration board. Once you have a number of pictures, edit out the ones that do not seem as interesting as they did initially. As you do this, you should see a pattern emerge, and this will help you identify the factor that appeals to you. It could be the color combinations, style, texture, the decoration used, shape, size, or any other factor. Once you recognize what it is, it will be easier to refine your board and eliminate those that do not feature this factor. This will bring you closer to your final idea of how your wedding cake should be.

Research your options

Once you have narrowed down your choices to just those that would be ideal for your cake design, it is time to research and identify what would work. For this, consider the various details about each of the cakes you’ve shortlisted. Some questions to help you in this direction are

  • what are the ingredients used in the frosting—fondant, buttercream, etc?
  • What techniques may be involved in making the design?
  • Is there any special work involved?
  • How are the special touches done?
  • Are the accessories you like ready-made or custom-created by the baker?
  • Why do you think you like a particular detail?
  • What would be the features you could eliminate if required?

Match it to your wedding

Your wedding cake, as much as it is an entity on its own, still has to belong to the wedding. For this, you should match it to the wedding theme. This would be in terms of colors, features, style, and size. Where cakes are concerned, your options are numerous. You can have a wedding cake with as many layers as you want, without all the tiers actually being “cake.” Or, you can have a couture cake that is impressive and serves for the cake cutting, while the guests are served with sheet cake slices in the same flavor. This brings down the cost, which is a very important factor in making your final cake decisions.

Determine your Budget

The quantity of cake you need depends on the number of guests at your wedding. Before meeting with your cake designer, you should compile information on the guest count, and calculate your cake budget. This will help you decide on the possible options, so you have enough cake for all your guests, while also meeting your expectations. Once you know the maximum you can afford to spend on a cake, it will also put you in a position to shortlist a suitable cake designer who will do the job for you within your set budget. This also gives you a general idea of the little extras that you can afford to have, without eating into other aspects of your wedding.

Consider aesthetic aspects

LilyGarden cake

The main factor that influences your choice for the cake is how it will finally look. Here are the aesthetic factors that you should consider.

  • Wedding theme: There are different ways in which you can integrate the cake into the wedding theme. This could be using the colors or similar details that are part of your décor.
  • Wedding colors: A talented and experienced cake designer should be able to create your cake in any color of your choice. She may also be able to suggest colors that work together, or tell you if something you suggest will not look good when executed. While all colors are possible, it is best to remember that appetizing cakes are usually done in light, breezy colors. So, you may like to stick with the lighter colors in your palette, for your cake.
  • Shape and Size: This article should help you understand the different cake shapes you can have at your wedding. This includes both traditional and contemporary styles, so you know about all the choices you have. If you have a limited budget, remember that simple shapes like round and square cost less, while the topsy-turvy shape or irregular ones will usually cost more. Where the size of the cake is concerned, you can have a huge-tiered cake, with faux tiers in between as a budget-friendly option. Or, if this is one area where you don’t mind splurging, go with the real thing all the way.
  • Cake accessories and decorations: You can dress your cake up easily, using suitable accessories and decorations. You have plenty of options, including fresh blooms, sugar flowers, plastic figures, and other accessories. Think of what you would like to have on your cake. Would you prefer elaborate embellishments, ready-made cake decorations, or ones made from fondant or sugar?

Taste options—what should you consider?

Just like with the aesthetics, the taste of your cake is equally important. Do this correctly by paying close attention to the following factors.

  • Shortlist the flavors you like

You will be overwhelmed with the flavor options available. Avoid confusion by shortlisting a few of your favorites, before you even visit your designer. You can then look at these flavors and anything similar that may suit your palette. Once you narrow down your choices, your cake designer can arrange for the chosen flavors at your tasting session. Although you can always go with a bold and unusual choice, remember that if you stick to common flavors, it will most likely be liked by all. Your cake should also be soft, spongy, and moist.

  • Discuss your filling choices

The overall taste of the cake will depend on the filling that you choose for it. So, decide whether you want something fruity, creamy, or chocolate. You can make this decision based on your personal preferences, or by looking at what is easily available and budget-friendly.

  • Choose your icing options

The icing will not only determine the finish of the cake, but also the taste. Some bakers specialize in fondant, while others are experts with buttercream. It is best to choose a vendor who has enough experience in working with the medium you prefer, for best results.

Check with your venue for any restrictions

Some venues have restrictions on what you are allowed to serve at your wedding. Some of them require you to use their in-house bakers itself, while others allow you to bring your own cake designer for an additional fee. Considering health and safety requirements, it may be necessary to go with a licensed professional for your wedding day. So, you should check for this factor with the venue manager in advance, before scouting for a vendor.

How will the cake get to the venue?

fresh flowers on cake

Getting your cake to the venue without damage is very important. If your cake designer will not be working onsite, you will have to check for the transport arrangements to get the finished cake to your venue. Will your baker arrange for this, or will you have to make transport arrangements yourself. If it has to be transported, the size of the cake will determine whether it will have to be transported in one piece or, if it will be assembled on-site. An experienced baker will normally have the provision to supply your cake to the reception venue. If this isn’t available, and you have to transport it by yourself, make sure you will be able to do it efficiently. Discuss the details about how it has to be transported as soon as you settle on the design.

The flexibility factor

Cakes in magazines and pictures may not always be easy to replicate. Each baker will have a unique style. As creative artists, they will appreciate a certain level of freedom, so they can contribute in their own way. If you are very particular about replicating certain aspects of a cake, make sure that you look for a cake designer who is equipped and experienced in working on that aspect. Moreover, replicating a picture entirely doesn’t make the design your own. So, we suggest you keep your options available to discuss what can be done to make a cake design that is your own. Also, keep the actual logistics in mind when you choose to go for a cake design you pick from a picture. The replication may look different in color, or the details may differ to a certain extent. Your cake designer will give you a correct idea of the extent to which your ideas are practical, and what changes would give you better results. Be open to such suggestions, and it will be a lot easier for both of you.

Create your list of preferred cake designers

Based on reviews, recommendations, and your own research, you should shortlist the vendors who would be good candidates for your job. Make sure you have more than just one option, in case the person you want is booked already, or you aren’t satisfied with what they have to offer when you actually meet. In all cases, it is advised to first start visiting with vendors you like most. So, if you find a cake designer who you like, you can immediately finalize the deal without having to check on any more vendors.

Discuss your plans with your fiance first

Unless your fiance doesn’t really care about how your wedding cake looks, it is necessary to gather his inputs as well, before you come to a final decision. Before you meet a cake designer, discuss the design together and come to an agreement on what you both like. Both of you should be happy with the design, flavor, and other details.

Once you have a clear idea of all the above-mentioned factors, you are ready to visit your cake designer and discuss your ideas. It is much easier for a cake designer to give you what you want when you have a very clear idea of what you would like. Nevertheless, be open to ideas and suggestions, as your cake designer is an experienced professional, and can give you valuable inputs on making the cake that is just perfect for your big day.

For more inputs and great inspiration for your special day, visit our online cake gallery at Best for Bride. Apart from delicious and great looking cakes, we also offer brides many more wedding services. With an impressive inventory of dresses for the wedding party and an exquisite designer wedding dress collection, we are the one-stop destination for everything a bride needs when planning the event of her lifetime. You can also find wedding stationery, wedding favors, décor accessories, and beautiful accessories on our website. Visit us online today, to see what we can do to complete your wedding day.

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10 new and exciting bridesmaids dress ideas

Bridesmaids in matching outfits, and resembling big balls of cotton candy! These belong to the past. Today’s brides are smart and sensible, and want their bridesmaids to look and feel great on their big day. For this to happen, it is quintessential to toss the old rule book and make way for new rules for dressing up your bridesmaids.

So, here are few ideas that will help you dress your handpicked girls to look fabulous and add extra drama and excitement to your wedding scenery. Enjoy!

Rule 1: Mix up the textures

Here is an interesting way to give each of your bridesmaids their unique style, while keeping the look cohesive–Choose dresses in the same shade but different fabrics. With this simple switch in fabric choices, you change the overall look, but with subtlety. This option also helps brides who aren’t very sure of how to do the mix ‘n’ match concept to get it right. Dresses in the same shade but using different fabrics will easily go together, and the difference in texture will add an extra dimension of fun. Most designer collections give you plenty of colors for each design, and this allows your bridesmaids enough choices. They can choose from lace and tulle, to satin and charmeuse. Another factor is that as the fabric changes, so does the price of the dress. So, this allows your bridesmaids to choose a dress for their budget, as long as the desired color is chosen. As long as there aren’t too many accessories, it is bound to bring all the bridesmaids together. Just make sure you confirm that the dresses are of the same shade, before you give a thumbs up.

We have an example here to illustrate this idea.

Our first pick is the vintage style 8622L from the Alfred Angelo collection, in a gray color and created in soft net.

We have paired it with the 7342L from the same collection, which is an organza gown in a similar shade. Notice how the different fabrics give either dress a distinct personality, even while they come together beautifully!

Rule 2: Color block with one constant

Color blocking is an easy and uncomplicated way to bring more than one color into your bridesmaids outfits. Dressing up your bridesmaids in the same colors can resemble the original pattern of having all matching bridesmaids. This doesn’t do justice to allowing your bridesmaids shine individually. The better option is to mix up color block dresses, with different colors. However, keep one color constant throughout, so that there is a unifying factor that brings their looks together.

Let us demonstrate this with an example. Take a look at the 7344S from the Alfred Angelo bridesmaids collection.  It features color blocking with a black bodice and a gray skirt.

A dress that will work well with it is the 7345S from the same collection with a black bodice and soft beige skirt.  Although distinct from the first, the black bodices are strikingly similar, and this will bind the two looks together. These dresses can be chosen in any color shade in the skirt, and so make a perfect choice to play with color blocking.

Rule 3: Neutral color dresses with accessories that pop

There are two advantages to choosing bridesmaids dresses in neutral shades—your bridesmaids are more likely to use the dress again and the colors are usually easy to mix into any color palette. White, black, brown, gray and navy are neutrals that are easy to work with and form great pairings with most color palettes. These are also shades that look good on almost every skin tone. So, your bridesmaids will not have to worry about how the color clashes with their complexion.

The result is that everyone is happy, except for one small issue; not all neutral colored dresses can make that strong presence you require for your wedding. The solution—dress it up a notch with accessories in bold colors that will not go unnoticed. Choose shoes, belts or jewelry, and it will instantly add the necessary punch of color to your bridesmaids outfits. It will certainly be a better idea than having your girls dressed in unusual colors that they may not appreciate. Since they are paired with a neutral, there is no chance of the accessories going overboard. And, how about making these your bridesmaids gifts? That way, they get to use it on your wedding day and show it off. So, you now no how to add peach, sunset yellow or bubblegum pink to your bridesmaids outfits without making your girls cringe.

Take a look at this picture to see what we mean. Here, the bridesmaids dresses are a sober beige, and a bright dose of color is added through colorful heels and bouquets. By mixing up the colors, the result is interesting and lively.

The colorful bridesmaids
Image Credits: Ms.Phoenix,via Flickr,CC BY 2.0

 Rule 4: Neutral color dresses with zingy metal and jewel tone accessories

For an ultra-stylish and glamorous look, choose neutral colored dresses and pair it with bright and beautifully designed golden accessories. There are two benefits to this choice—your bridesmaids will most likely use the neutral dress again, and the metallic accessories will also work for them on another occasion. So it is a win-win situation, where they can get the best value for their money.

Here is a beautiful black evening gown, the J4003 from the lovely Jadore collection at Best for Bride.

Featuring a wide cut scoop neckline, sheath silhouette and softly sculpted cap sleeves, the gown is a beauty by itself. However, pairing it with an oversize gold necklace, waistband and bracelet makes it a dress that personifies Hollywood glamour. We are sure your bridesmaids will be excited to have a look like this. With such brilliant accessories, they will have that festive dressy look, perfect for a wedding day. The best part is that the dress being in a neutral shade gives them so many options to dress it up differently on another occasion. So, it’s definitely not a dress that will be exiled to the confines of their closets after your big celebration.

Rule 5: Go to different lengths to vary the style

Of the different ways to keep a consistent look but add drama, one of our favorites is to vary the lengths of the various gowns while keeping the color or print constant. This gives you ample choice to choose dresses in lengths that suit different body shapes and ages. So, if you have bridesmaids from different age groups and looking entirely distinct, you can easily vary the look yet bring it all together with dresses of varying hemlines. We look at dresses from the Mori Lee bridesmaids collection to bring you two examples of dresses that can achieve this look effortlessly.

Our first choice is the navy blue tulle 112 bridesmaid gown from the Mori Lee Tulle Affairs collection.

A full-length gown in tulle, with a sweetheart neckline and interesting criss-cross ruched bodice, this dress is elegant and looks best on both tall and short bridesmaids.

Here, we pair it with the Mori Lee 11100 from the same collection.

This dress has an illusion lace neckline and cap sleeves, and a short and fun skirt that ends a little above the knee. Although the two dresses are entirely different, they make a splendid combination because of the matching color. Hence you have suitable choices both for the women who want to look elegant and the bold and fun-loving bridesmaids in your wedding party.

Rule 6: Go from dark to light in a single color

Choose colors like red or yellow, and ask your bridesmaids to pick dresses in different shades of this color. This will keep the spectrum constant, but with interesting variation. This ombre trend has been in the limelight for a while now, and is an exciting way to dress up your bridesmaids. The only thing you should remember when choosing this option for dressing your bridesmaids, is that you should choose colors that cannot vary too much. Green, purple and blue are colors that can go totally wrong, if this happens. This is because colors like turquoise can fall into both shades, although it may look entirely different from pure shades like navy blue and mint green. So, choose colors that can vary only in the intensity of the black and white they may contain, when you choose this method.

Rule 7: One color with different prints

Printed bridesmaids dresses are interesting and exciting. While you may be tempted to choose the same prints for all your bridesmaids, it is a better idea to look around and find dresses in the same color with different prints instead. This will add a subtle variation to the look, and each bridesmaid will be unique in her own way. The unifying factor will be the color that all the dresses feature, and this is all that is required to bring the overall look together. You can also consider mixing up dresses that have prints all over with those where the prints are limited to chosen areas on the dress, like the yoke or hemline. Here are two dresses from the Jadore collection. The first is the J6013 from the Jadore collection, with black prints on a beige base.

The next is the J5009 from the same collection, with the same combination of colors done entirely different.

Rule 8: Alternate plain and print

In this option, your job is relatively easy. All you have to do is finalize a color and choose one plain and one printed bridesmaid dress in it. Alternate this choice for your bridesmaids, so you have equal numbers wearing the plain colored dress, and the same number wearing printed dresses. By keeping the designs uniform and the hemlines of both styles the same, the entire group looks well coordinated and classy.

Here is a wedding party that has achieved this result with alternate plain and printed purple dresses.

@shoopsmoo &#bridesmaids
Image Credits:leesean, via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

The printed purple dresses feature very subtle white floral prints all over the length of the gown. The dresses blend well with the plain purple dresses that the rest of the bridesmaids wear. What we specifically loved about this combination is that the plain dresses are not exactly similar, each one features a different neckline. Thus we can safely conclude that each bridesmaid has her distinct style of dress, and yet gels in with the group seamlessly.

Rule 9: Add variety with infinity dresses

Infinity dresses are basically dresses that can be worn in various different styles. It is the true convertible dress. Here, the fabric left in the neckline and bodice to be wrapped in different ways to yield different looks. By draping the top half of the dress in different ways, you can achieve different necklines like the one-shoulder strap, strapless neckline, cap-sleeve look and more. This dress allows each of your bridesmaids to wear the style that flatters her most. Hence, it is versatile and everyone ends up happy. Check out this article on My Wedding website, which illustrates the different ways in which an infinity dress can be draped. With this choice, you play it safe by choosing the same color for all. Even so, each has her personal style enhanced with a suitable pattern.

Rule 10: Same style, different prints

We have seen prints and plains as well as textures in the same color and pattern. Now, the only one left to experiment with is prints in the same pattern. This is a fun and exciting way to make your bridesmaids stand out from the rest of the crowd. Printed dresses make them look different from typical bridesmaids, but the unifying design brings the entire party together instantly. Here is a sample.

The Lil' Getting Ready Bridesmaid Dress Styled Shoot.
Image Credits: Plum Pretty Sugar, via Flickr, CC BY 2.0

In this picture, the pretty bridesmaids sport strapless dresses with vibrant prints. The hemline is uniform, and ends at mid-thigh. The dress also features a bow detail at the waistline, making all three dresses unusually cohesive.

Hope you now have enough inspiration to mix and match and perfect your bridesmaids dress looks. For more exciting inputs on styling your wedding, as well as for all your wedding shopping needs, continue visiting us at Best for Bride—your one stop bridal destination.

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Wedding Dress Lingo you should know

If you are newly engaged and  beginning your research on wedding dresses, don’t be surprised if you are confused by terms like “fit and flare”, trumpet style, mermaid, etc.. These are all words that commonly float around in bridal boutiques, those that you will hear during wedding dress shows and even see on blog pages like ours.

To be honest, this industry has its own language! Unless you’ve been following it closely, it can sound confusing and you may have no idea what the terms mean. But, as a soon-to-be bride, we think it is essential that you familiarize yourself with some of the most commonly used wedding terms, before you go shopping. This will make you more comfortable and also allow you to understand what your bridal consultant means when she uses technical terms to define a dress. Trust us, it will save you from feeling overwhelmed at your dress appointment.

To save you the trouble of finding all these out by yourself, we have compiled the commonly used words from the wedding world here. This will allow you to describe the dress in your vision in crisp terms to your shop assistant, without having to just search through hundreds of dresses to find what you think you want.

Wedding dress silhouettes

A silhouette basically refers to the way the dress drapes around your body. It is important to choose a silhouette that flatters your figure. When you choose the right one, you can highlight your best features and camouflage the less desirable features.

In the wedding world, the following are the most popular silhouettes that are used in dresses.

A-line: Also called princess-line, this dress resembles the letter “A.” It closely follows the body in the bodice and then flows outwards from the waist without looking too bulky.

Ball gown: This dress usually features a fitted bodice and a full skirt that is usually poufy with several layers of fabric. This is the silhouette commonly associated with fairy tales and princesses, and is great for rectangular and pear-shaped brides.

Mermaid: Also known as fit and flare, it fits closely all the way down the bodice and waist, till the knees. From here, it flares out into a layered skirt. Since it fits snugly, it is suitable for hourglass figures.

Trumpet: The trumpet is similar to the mermaid and is another fit and flare style, with a fitted bodice and body. But here, the dress flairs at mid-thigh instead of at the knee. Thus, it hides the hips and legs and is good for hourglass and rectangle-shape brides as it emphasizes the curves.

Sheath: A straight cut dress that falls over the body frame naturally and loosely drapes the actual curves of the bride. Suitable for slim figures and hourglass brides.

To learn more about choosing a dress that suits your body shape, check out our previous post HERE.

Wedding dress necklines

As the name suggests, this is how the neck of the dress is designed. Popularly seen styles are listed below.

V-neckline: Seen on dresses with straps or sleeves, the neckline resembles a V that dips down in the front. It can either be deep, high, wide or small.

Strapless: As the name suggests, there are no straps and the neckline cuts straight across the bust.

Sweetheart: A romantic version of the strapless style, this neckline gently follows the natural curves of the bust, and resembles the top of a heart. It is usually seen on dresses without sleeves, but may also be combined with sheer necklines.

Illusion: One of the most popular styles today, the illusion features a thin layer of sheer fabric over the actual bodice. This may be embellished with beads, rhinestones or lace to create beautiful details. It offers a covering to the bust area, and usually ends higher up in a round, halter or bateau style neckline.

Bateau or boat: A wide neckline that extends from one shoulder to the other, and follows the curve of the collarbone without revealing much of the decolletage.

Scoop: It is U-shaped, and the depth may vary from design to design. It looks great on most brides, but is particularly favorable for women with angular features.

Halter: The neckline wraps around the neck like a collar using straps that either go around the neck or are locked at the back with buttons.

Off-the-shoulder: This neckline gently skims the shoulder on the edges, leaving the neckline and top of the shoulders exposed. It is stylish and sexy, and great for showing off well-toned shoulders and necks.

Find out more about choosing the right neckline that is best for your shape and structure, on this previous article of ours.

Wedding dress lengths and train

Wedding gowns come in various lengths, varying from long and dramatic to short and stylish. There are also different train lengths to consider if you choose a traditional wedding gown. Let us look at the various options here.

Royal: Here, the length of the dress extends to 6 feet or more, from the waist. It is a very traditional style, and very dramatic.

Watteau: Here the train attaches to the dress at either the shoulders or the waist, and flows separately from the hemline.

Sweep: Can barely be considered a train at all, as it just sweeps the floor, and extends to a few inches beyond the skirt.

Chapel: Slightly longer than the sweep train, it is a train that is more obvious. Typically between 12 and 18 inches long from the hemline.

Cathedral: This is a formal train, and extends to over 20 inches along the floor. These gowns usually have to be bustled following the ceremony, or in some cases, the train may be detachable.

Ankle-length: Suitable for outdoor and casual ceremonies, the gown ends at the ankles and does not really feature a train.

Floor-length: The gown just skims the ground on all sides, and doesn’t have a train, so to say.

Ballerina: The hemline of a ballerina ends just above the ankles, and the skirt is usually very poufy and fun.

Tea-length or cocktail length: Here the gown ends near the calf, somewhat mid-way between knee and ankle.

Knee-length: The dress ends just below the knee and is commonly seen at casual outdoor events or those with a vintage style.

Wedding dress Fabric

The choice of fabric is important, as it makes the dress suitable for the weather at the time you are getting married, the venue and also the look you wish to portray. While some fabrics are crisp and stiff, others may be soft,flowy and breathable. These are the most popularly seen fabric choices in wedding gowns.

Tulle: Sheer fabric with a net-like appearance. Used for skirts, is rather stiff and has an open weave. This is what veils are usually made from.

Taffeta: Crisp like tulle, but it is smooth and has a softer drape.

Satin: Soft and silky to the touch, satin is characterized by a glossy look and very soft feel. It is heavy and has a highly reflective look.

Chiffon: Soft, semi-transparent and delicate. It drapes well, and falls gently. Chiffon has a light feel and is popularly used in skirts that flow softly to the ground.

Organza: Similar to tulle, but stronger and softer. It is slightly rougher than chiffon, but is crisp and sheer.

We have a detailed post on the different fabrics that are used in wedding gowns. You may like to check it out here.

Wedding gown waistlines

The waistline of the dress is another important element, similar to the silhouette, that can greatly alter the overall look. There are options that highlight slender waists, and also those that hide unseemly bumps in the waist area. Here are the different types available.

Natural Waistline: Here the skirt begins at the natural waist, which falls between the ribcage and the hips. It is not suitable for brides who are bulky in the stomach area. In certain dress styles, the natural waistline may be highlighted with the use of a separating element such as a sash or belt. It basically sits at the slimmest part of the torso, between the bust and the hips.

No waistline: In dresses with fit and flare styles, the waistline may not be defined at all. The dress simply follows the natural curves of the wearer all the way from the bust to the hips or knees, and that is where the skirt begins. This is usually suitable for brides with hourglass figures or those who are slender with a well-toned figure, free from unsightly bumps anywhere on the torso.

Empire Waistline: This is an elevated waistline, that begins just beneath the bust. The skirt usually flares out from just below the bust, hiding the real waistline. It is a good style for brides who wish to hide their mid-section and draw attention to the bust.

 

Basque: This waistline is a dropped waistline in the shape of a V. The dropped style looks good on brides who are short as it creates the illusion of length.

Dropped Waistline: In this style the waistline ends several inches below the original waist. The skirt starts below this point and it may either been seen towards the center, or else draping outwards towards the side in asymmetrical style wedding dresses. It elongates the torso, and so is suitable for short brides who want to create the illusion of height and a fuller figure.

Asymmetrical Waistline: In this dress, the waistline drapes towards the side instead of the center. It can start high up, at the empire waistline height and end low in a dropped waistline fashion.

Wedding dress sleeves

Wedding dresses may come with sleeves or without. While the sleeveless and strapless style are quite popular among brides, Traditional brides may also choose to go with wedding dresses that usually feature sleeves. There are again several options in wedding dress sleeves, and let us look at what they are.

Sleeveless: The arms are exposed but the dress is held in place with the help of straps that go over the shoulder. The width of the straps may vary according to the design, and this will determine the support it offers the bodice.

Spaghetti straps: Very thin straps frame the shoulders of the dress, and these are usually embellished with scintillating elements to add more drama. The dress resembles a strapless style, with the exception of the thin spaghetti straps on it.

Cap Sleeves: The shortest style of sleeves, these sleeves just cover the uppermost part of the shoulder. It is stylish and modest, without looking too traditional.

Butterfly sleeves: Short sleeves that flail and flutter beyond the shoulder and end a few inches below. It has a romantic and whimsical effect, suitable for vintage style wedding themes.

T-shirt sleeves: As the name suggests, the sleeve ends anywhere between the shoulder and the elbow and is usually fits the circumference of the arm.

Three-fourth length sleeves: The sleeves often end below the elbow and above the wrist. It is slimming, and the sleeves are usually done in lace or illusion style to form an attractive feature on the dress.

Long sleeves: The sleeves reach or extend below the wrist of the arm.

Juliet sleeves: A distinct style that is popular on the runways, these sleeves are puffed at the shoulder and then continue into a slender arm that closely fits the entire length of the bride’s arms all the way to the wrist.

Choosing the right sleeve length is imperative to determining your overall look. Many dress designers offer the option of adding custom sleeves, if the dress you choose doesn’t have the sleeve you desire. You can also consider using accessories like jackets or boleros to add the effect of sleeves, if you aren’t happy with the original sleeve-length of the dress.

We suggest that you take a look at this previous article to read more about selecting the right sleeve length for your wedding dress to look your best on your wedding day.

It may seem like a lot to take in initially. You needn’t study all of them, but just use this as a reference to guide you towards the dress features that you would like to look at. Browse through our online bridal gallery at Best for Bride, and you will not take too long to recognize the various terms used here. It can become interesting and fun, so do try it. For wedding dresses of all styles and sizes, visit us at Best for Bride today, and make your dream vision of being a beautiful bride come true.